Frequently asked questions about reporting doping

1. Who can report a concern or speak out?

2. How can I report a concern?

3. What sorts of things can I report?

4. What activities can be disclosed?

5. Who can be alleged to have committed doping misconduct?

6. Is there anything I should do before filing a report?

7. What happens when I file a report?

8. How is my confidentiality protected?

9. What personal information does DFSNZ collect about the person making a report?

10. What personal information does DFSNZ collect about other people mentioned in the report?

11. How is that personal information used?

12. With whom does DFSNZ share personal information?

Answers:

1. Who can report a concern?
Anyone can report a concern or pass on their suspicions. If you have found out about, identified, seen, know of, or have reasonable grounds for suspecting doping misconduct, we want you to Speak Out!

It doesn’t matter if you are an athlete, coach or trainer or if you are a parent, a member of the team staff, an agent or a manager.  If you see or hear of something suspicious, we would like you to Speak Out!

We receive reports on a regular basis, and every report is passed on to our Investigations and Intelligence Team.

2. How can I report a concern?
You can file a report via the secure DFSNZ website - use the form above. Or you can contact our Investigations and Intelligence Team directly at 0800 DRUGFREE (378 437) or email intel@drugfreesport.org.nz

You can contact us via social media channels with questions, but it’s better if you use our website or 0800 DRUGFREE to ensure a confidential report. 

3. What sorts of things can I report?
People have reported things like being offered steroids or “gear” over social media, or being offered unspecified “vitamins” by management or coaching staff.  Others have reported conversations they have heard with people talking about using drugs in sport.

Sports officials and competitors have reported suspicions about sudden dramatic increases in performance, and rumours about drug use.  We have previously received information from people concerned about the health of people they know.

Even if your concerns may seem minor, please get in touch.  If you think it is suspicious we would like to hear about it.

4. What activities can be disclosed?
Any suspicious doping activity can be subject of a report. It doesn’t matter whether it was done in the past, is something that someone is doing right now, or intends to do in future. Using a banned substance is only one example of an anti-doping rule violation.  Being in possession of a banned substance, providing drugs for another athlete or intentionally evading drug testers are just some of the other violations. Here's a full list of anti-doping rule violations.

5. Who can be alleged to have committed doping misconduct?
Athletes, coaches, team doctors and physios and in some cases, parents of athletes.

You can contact us to discuss your concerns, please contact DFSNZ’s Investigations and Intelligence Team, in confidence, directly at 0800 DRUGFREE (378 437) or intel@drugfreesport.org.nz

6. Is there anything I should do before filing a report?
We know that this may cause some worry for you. To ease any concerns, we encourage you to read the Report Doping Policy which sets out your rights and responsibilities through this process.

Should you wish to seek further advice prior to making a formal disclosure of an alleged misconduct, you are welcome to contact the DFSNZ Investigations and Intelligence Team, in confidence, at 0800 DRUGFREE (378 437) or intel@drugfreesport.org.nz

7. What happens when I file a report?
Your report will be directed to DFSNZ’s Investigations and Intelligence Team who investigate your allegations. An investigator may contact you for additional information. This can include email correspondence, phone calls and/or face-to-face interviews. 

The investigator may also conduct additional enquiries. Your confidentiality will be maintained during this investigation process.

8. How is my confidentiality protected?
We encourage you to provide us with your name.  However, it is not necessary to do so when you file a report.

Rest assured that if you provide your name, we will not reveal it beyond DFSNZ, unless you give your express written consent.

We place a great deal of faith in the information provided to us and use it as a basis for launching investigations.  Being able to communicate with one another develops a trusting relationship that we hope will lead to more successful and satisfying outcomes for both parties.

9. What personal information does DFSNZ collect about the person making a report?
If you provide them to us, we collect your name, contact details, and any details relating to you that you have included in your report or supporting materials. We also collect information relating to you that you include in any follow-up correspondence.

10. What personal information does DFSNZ collect about other people mentioned in the report?
We collect personal information about other people if you include it in your report. We may also receive further information during subsequent correspondence with you, or from DFSNZ’s own investigations.

11. How is that personal information used?
Personal information will be used primarily for investigating the claims and allegations described in your report and communicating with you, as shown in the Report Doping Policy.

Your identity will not be revealed to anyone beyond the dedicated DFSNZ unless you specifically give express and written consent to do so, or in the event that it is required by law.

Evidence and information is safely stored with limited access by the DFSNZ Investigations and Intelligence Team in accordance with Rule 14 of the Sports Anti-Doping Rules and the International Standard on the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information.

12. With whom does DFSNZ share personal information?
We will respect and uphold your privacy rights in accordance with New Zealand’s Privacy Act 1993.  We also adhere to the International Standard on the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information which is a document created by WADA.  This document regulates how anti-doping agencies must deal with personal information.  Article 8 of the International Standard on the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information controls what information can be disclosed to other anti-doping organisations and third parties. 

Those third parties may include law enforcement agencies, customs agencies, courts, other public authorities and relevant anti-doping organisations.